Are These Pills Safe for Diabetics? Find Out What to Watch Out For

Diabetes Risks from Prescription and Nonprescription Drugs: Mechanisms and Approaches to Risk Reduction

For people living with diabetes, it really becomes a challenge when they also have co-existing health concerns. This is because diabetics have to make sure that the pills they take will not be detrimental to the management of their condition.

Take breast enhancers, for example. There are already pills out on the market that can do the job of increasing your breasts to the size you prefer, but for women with diabetes, these might not be as readily accessible. Taking them alongside one’s current medication may prove to be a risky drug combination.

Drug Interaction

Here is the major concern. Drugs that treat diabetes are some of the most reactive medications out there. This means that they bear a higher risk of causing adverse drug reactions. While some reactions are mild enough to be managed at home, some have caused hospitalization and in some unfortunate cases, death.

How exactly do these drugs interact?

When you take in a certain pill, it will then be absorbed into the bloodstream and will proceed to do what it needs to do. Interaction happens when the effect of another pill interferes with the effects of other pills taken. This is the main reason why you have to understand the effects of each of the different pills that you take. Even the most mundane of pills, such as herbal breast enhancers or those for a common cold might still pose health concerns.

Possible Effects

As mentioned earlier, some effects really do not have a bad outcome.  However, there are several serious effects that might exacerbate certain conditions especially for those living with diabetes.  Some of these include the following:

Higher blood pressure levels

Drugs staying in the bloodstream longer than necessary

Drugs blocking metabolism which might cause fatal heart rhythms

Inhibiting the effects of drugs that are used to treat or manage the major health concern

Drugs affecting kidneys

Drugs increasing the risk of bleeding or fluid retention

Drugs causing rhabdomyolysis or incidence of muscle breakdown

Breast Enhancers

Without a doubt, there certainly are quite a number of medically approved breast enhancers available on the market.  However, this does not mean to say that anyone can safely take them, especially those with health concerns like diabetes.

In fact, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons has issued an advisory regarding this very issue.  Some pills might be dangerous when mixed with other medications, so it would be ill-advised to take any sort of medication without proper consultation and research.

To start, it is essential that one first know the most common ingredients found in breast enhancers.  Some of the most popular components found in herbal supplements that claim breast enhancing properties are the following:

Blessed thistle

Dong quai

Fennel seed

Fenugreek

Kelp

Licorice

Mexican wild yam

Pueraria mirifica

”Project

What You Can Do

For people who self-manage their health concerns such as diabetes, research is not enough. Here are some things that you can do to protect you from dangerous effects of drug combinations.

1.The number one thing is to consult one’s physician. Make sure you have the list of all of the drugs you take.  In fact, it would be better if you bring the drugs themselves.  If you want to take breast enhancers even those in the form of supplements, you still have to declare them and disclose what pills you intend to take.

2.To know more about possible drug interactions, you can also check the FDA website. It has detailed information regarding drug interactions that will be helpful to you.  Several medical-related websites offer the same information but be careful about relying solely on online sources for drug information.  The safest thing is to show the pills to your physician or your trusted pharmacist before taking them.

Have a safety-first mindset.  Before taking in pills like breast enhancers with your existing medication, make sure you know what you are getting yourself into.  See your physician.  Do your research.  This might spell the difference between life and death.

Author:Melissa Lobo

Melissa is a young and energetic writer, a mom to a sweet little boy, and a fur-mom to two perfect pooches. Before becoming the Associate Content Director for Project Female, she was a journalist specializing in topics related to women in politics and policy affecting women.

Email address:
mlobo@expertlinked.com

Recent Work:
10 Things Every Woman Can Do To Improve Her Outlook And Day
The Top Ways Society Tries to Keep Women Down and How to Overcome the Hurdles
Understanding and Treating Female Hair Loss
The Ultimate Guide to Weight Loss for Women

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Please email momo19@diabetessupportsite.com or leave your comments below.

Side Effects Of Non-insulin Injectable Diabetes Drugs

In addition to insulin, other types of injected medicines are now available.

New- Mechanisms- in- Glucose- Control
New Mechanisms in Glucose Control

Other drugs include:

(A)Albiglutide (Tanzeum)

GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1).
The Insulinotropic Gut Hormone Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (Frontiers in Diabetes)

It’s a man-made version of a hormone called GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1). Your intestines normally release this substance when you eat. It helps control your blood sugar.

Who can take it: Adults who have type 2 diabetes and haven’t had success with other treatment. If you’re planning to get pregnant, talk with your doctor, since researchers haven’t studied albiglutide in pregnant women.

What it does: After you eat, albiglutide helps your pancreas release insulin, which moves blood sugar (glucose) into your cells. It also limits how much of the hormone glucagon your body makes. This substance spurs your liver to release stored sugar. The drug also slows down digestion.

Side effects: The most common ones are upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhea, nausea, and skin reactions where you give yourself the shot. All GLP-1 drugs, including albiglutide, have a boxed warning noting that in animal studies, this type of drug has been linked to thyroid cancer in some rats and mice. Experts don’t know whether it has the same effect in people, though. Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe, is another side effect.

(B)Exenatide (Bydureon, Byetta)

Exenatide (Bydureon, Byetta)
Losing Weight with Your Diabetes Medication: How Byetta and Other Drugs Can Help You Lose More Weight than You Ever Thought Possible (Marlowe Diabetes Library)

What it is: Exenatide was the first GLP-1 drug approved by the FDA. Byetta came first. You take it as a shot twice daily. Bydureon is the newer, extended-release version, which you inject once a week. You can’t take both drugs.

Who can take it: Adults with type 2 diabetes for whom other treatment hasn’t worked. If you think you might get pregnant, talk to your doctor. Researchers haven’t studied this drug in pregnant women.

What it does: Like other GLP-1 drugs, exenatide tells your pancreas to release insulin, which moves glucose out of your bloodstream and into your cells. It also limits how much glucagon your body makes. This hormone prompts your liver to release stored sugar. The drug slows digestion, too.

Side effects: The most common ones include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, feeling jittery, dizziness, headache, acid stomach, constipation, and weakness. These usually go away after the first month of treatment. Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe, is another side effect.

The FDA has also received reports of kidney failure in people taking this drug. All GLP-1 drugs, including both types of exenatide, have a boxed warning noting that in animal studies, this type of drug has been linked to thyroid cancer in some rats and mice. Experts don’t know whether it has the same effect in people. It’s possible you could get low blood sugar or have an allergic reaction to the drug.

(C)Liraglutide (Victoza)

VICTOZA (Liraglutide
VICTOZA (Liraglutide): Used with a Diet and Exercise Program to Control Blood Sugar Levels in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

What it is: This is another GLP-1 drug. You inject it once a day. It helps your body release more insulin. This helps move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells.

Who can take it: Adults who have type 2 diabetes but haven’t had results with other treatment. You take it in combination with metformin or a sulfonylurea drug. If you’re planning to get pregnant, talk with your doctor. Liraglutide hasn’t been studied in pregnant women.

What it does: Like the other GLP-1 drugs, liraglutide cues your pancreas to release insulin. This moves glucose out of your bloodstream and into your cells. It also limits how much of the hormone glucagon your body makes. This substance prompts your liver to release stored sugar. The drug also slows digestion.

Side effects: The most common ones include nausea, diarrhea, and headache. Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe, is another side effect.

All GLP-1 drugs, including liraglutide, have a boxed warning noting that in animal studies, this type of drug has been linked to thyroid cancer in some rats and mice. Experts don’t know whether it has the same effect in people.

It’s possible to have an allergic reaction to liraglutide, or to get low blood sugar while you’re taking it. If you get dehydrated from nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea, that could lead to kidney failure.

(D)Pramlintide (Symlin)

Pramlintide (Symlin)
Pramlintide

What it is: It’s a man-made version of a hormone called amylin, which your pancreas makes along with insulin when your blood sugar levels rise.

Who can take it: It’s approved for people with type 1 diabetes who are taking insulin. It’s also OK’d for people with type 2 diabetes who are taking insulin, a sulfonylurea drug, or metformin. If you think you could get pregnant, tell your doctor, since researchers haven’t studied this drug in pregnant women.

What it does: You take pramlintide with insulin after a meal. The two drugs work together to lower your blood sugar. Pramlintide also helps you digest food more slowly. This puts less sugar into your bloodstream. In addition to controlling your A1C levels, pramlintide helps lessen your appetite, so you eat less.

Side effects: Nausea is the most common one. Starting this drug at a low dose and increasing it slowly can help fight the nausea. Other side effects include less appetite, vomiting, stomach pain, tiredness, dizziness, or indigestion. The drug can also cause low blood sugar if you don’t adjust the amount of insulin you’re taking.

(E)Dulaglutide (Trulicity)

GLP-1- drug
Oral Antidiabetic Drugs and GLP-1 Analogues in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

What it is: This is another GLP-1 drug. Unlike the others, you inject it only once a week. It helps your body release more insulin and move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells.

Who can take it: Adults with type 2 diabetes who have not had success with other diabetes treatment. You can take it alone, or in combination with metformin, pioglitazone, or a sulfonylurea drug. If you’re planning to get pregnant, tell your doctor, since researchers haven’t studied this drug in pregnant women.

What it does: Like other GLP-1 drugs, dulaglutide prompts your pancreas to release insulin, which moves glucose out of your bloodstream and into your cells. It also limits how much of the hormone glucagon your body makes, since glucagon normally spurs your liver to release stored sugar. The drug slows digestion, too.

Side effects: The most common ones include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, belly pain, and less appetite. All GLP-1 drugs, including dulaglutide, have a boxed warning noting that in animal studies, this type of drug has been linked to thyroid cancer in some rats and mice. Experts don’t know whether it has the same effect in people.

If you have any information,questions, or feedback you would like to include in this post.

Please email momo19@diabetessupportsite.com or leave your comments below.

Side Effects Of Diabetes Pills

Some people experience a variety of side effects from different oral diabetes drugs.

Each of the medicines discussed here has side effects and other warnings and precautions. Some diabetes pills have been associated with increased risk of heart disease. It is important to discuss the risks and benefits of a drug with your doctor before starting any therapy.

A.Sulfonylureas

Analytical-method-development-and-validation
Analytical Method Development and Validation: Simultaneous Estimation of Pioglitazone and Glimepiride in Tablet Dosage Form by RP-HPLC

These pills do two things:

Help your pancreas make more insulin.

Help your body use the insulin it makes.

For these pills to work, your pancreas has to make some insulin.

Generic names for some of the more common sufonylureas are glimepiride, glyburide, chlorpropamide, and glipizide.

Some sulfonylureas work all day, so you take them only once a day – usually before breakfast. Others you take twice a day, typically before breakfast and before supper. Your doctor will tell you how many times a day you should take your diabetes pills.

Some possible side effects include low blood glucose (hypoglycemia), upset stomach, skin rash or itching, and/or weight gain.

B.Biguanides

metformin
METFORMIN Tablet: Used with Diet and Exercise to Improve Sugar Control in Adults and Children with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Known under the generic name metformin (met-FOR-min), this drug helps lower blood glucose by making sure your liver does not make too much glucose. Metformin also lowers the amount of insulin in your body.

Metformin can improve blood fat and cholesterol levels.  Also, metformin does not cause blood glucose to get too low (hypoglycemia) when it is the only diabetes medicine you take.

Regular metformin is taken 2 to 3 times a day, with meals. Your doctor will tell you which meals to take it with.  There is an extended release version of metformin which is taken once a day.

Some possible side effects of metformin include nausea, diarrhea and other stomach symptoms, weakness or difficulty breathing, or a metallic taste in the mouth.

People with kidney problems and people who drink more than 2-4 alcoholic drinks per week should not take metformin. If you are having surgery or any medical test involving dye, tell the doctor. You may be asked to stop taking metformin for a while.

C.Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors

Known under the generic names acarbose and miglitol, these medicines block the enzymes that digest the starches you eat. This action causes a slower and lower rise of blood glucose through the day, but mainly right after meals.

Neither acarbose nor miglitol causes hypoglycemia when it is the only diabetes medicine you take.

You take these pills three times a day, with the first bite of each meal. Your doctor might ask you to take the medicine less often at first.

Possible side effects include stomach problems (gas, bloating, and diarrhea). These side effects often go away after you take the medicine for a while.

D.Thiazolidinediones

rosiglitazone
Rosiglitazone – A Medical Dictionary, Bibliography, and Annotated Research Guide to Internet References – SECOND EDITION

Sold under the generic names pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, these pills help make your cells more sensitive to insulin. The insulin can then move glucose from your blood into your cells for energy.

Pioglitazone is usually taken once a day, while rosiglitazone is taken either once or twice a day, with or without a meal. If taken as the only diabetes pill, they do not cause blood glucose to drop too low.

Possible side effects of pioglitazone or rosiglitazone include weight gain, anemia, and swelling in the legs or ankles. In addition,

It is important for your doctor to check your liver enzyme levels regularly. Call your doctor right away if you have any signs of liver disease: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, lack of appetite, tiredness, yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, or dark-colored urine.

If you take birth control pills, medicines in this group might make your birth control pills less effective, which increases your chances of getting pregnant.

E.Meglitinides

nateglinide
Synthesis and characterization of nateglinide derivatives: Synthesis and characterization of nateglinide derivatives

Known under the generic names repaglinide and nateglinide, this pill helps your pancreas make more insulin right after meals, which lowers blood glucose.

Repaglinide works fast and your body uses it quickly. Repaglinide lowers blood glucose the most one hour after you take it, and it is out of the bloodstream in three to four hours. This fast action means you can vary the times you eat and the number of meals you eat more easily using repaglinide than you can using other diabetes pills.

Repaglinide is taken from thirty minutes before to just before you eat a meal. If you skip a meal, you should not take the dose of repaglinide.

Possible side effects include hypoglycemia and weight gain.

F.Glyburide and Metformin Combination

Glyburide- and- Metformin Combination
GLUCOVANCE (Glyburide & Metformin): Used along with Diet and Exercise to improve Glycemic Control or Sugar Level in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Glyburide and metformin are also combined into single pills. They are taken once or twice a day, with meals.

Side Effects

This combination pill may cause your blood glucose to drop too low. Also, your doctor may not want you to take it if you have kidney problems.

If you need medical tests that require using dyes, or if you are having surgery, your doctor will tell you to stop taking this medicine for a short time.

The pills should not be used by people who often drink alcoholic beverages.

G.DPP-4 Inhibitors

Sitagliptin (brand name Januvia
JANUVIA (Sitagliptin): Used along with Diet and Exercise and sometimes with other medications to Lower Blood Sugar Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

Sitagliptin (brand name Januvia) is a once-a-day pill that helps to lower blood sugar in two ways:

Increases insulin when blood sugar is high, especially after you eat. This is when the body needs the most help in lowering blood sugar.

Reduces the amount of sugar made by your liver after you eat, when your body doesn’t need it.

Sitagliptin can be taken alone, or in combination with other diabetes pills such as metformin, or sulfonylureas.

Sitagliptin is also combined with metformin into a single pill, sold under the brand name Janumet.

When Januvia is used with a sulfonylurea, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur. To avoid this risk, your doctor may prescribe lower doses of the sulfonylurea.

Possible side effects include upper respiratory tract infection, stuffy or runny nose and sore throat, and headache.

The goal of these oral medications is to help the body stimulate and use insulin more effectively and to lower blood sugar. However, different classes of these drugs achieve this goal differently. Exactly which class of drug your health care practitioner prescribes for you will depend on your individual situation, your blood glucose levels and any side effects you may experience.

Eventually most type 2 diabetics who don’t lower their blood sugar levels will stop producing insulin altogether.

At this point, diet and exercise will not be able to reverse the effects of diabetes, and many type 2 diabetics will ultimately need insulin therapy (via injection) in combination with oral antidiabetic medications.

If you have any information,questions, or feedback you would like to include in this post.

Please email momo19@diabetessupportsite.com or leave your comments below.

Side Effects Of Insulin

insulin-therapy
Insulin Therapy: A Pocket Guide

Hypoglycemia is the most common and serious side effect of insulin, occurring in type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

Symptoms of low blood sugar(Hypoglycemia) can be mild, such as a feeling of lightheadedness, but can also be severe. In extreme cases, low blood sugar can even lead to coma and death. Other symptoms of low blood sugar include sweating, confusion and rapid breathing. Loss of consciousness is a less common, but severe symptom of low blood sugar.

Insulin overdose can occur if you use too much insulin or if you use the right amount of insulin but eat less than usual or exercise more than usual. Insulin overdose can cause hypoglycemia. If you have any symptoms of hypoglycemia, follow your doctor’s instructions for what you should do if you develop hypoglycemia. Other symptoms of overdose are loss of consciousness and seizures.

Hyperglycemia is the result of your body receiving too little insulin. You may feel confused or drowsy. Other effects include rapid breathing, breath that smells fruity, increased urination or extreme thirst.  if you experience these symptoms you may need to speak with your doctor in order to adjust your insulin dosage.

Some other side effects of insulin. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

1.rash and/or itching over the whole body

2.shortness of breath

3.wheezing

4.dizziness

5.blurred vision

6.fast heartbeat

7.sweating

8.difficulty breathing or swallowing

9.weakness

10.muscle cramps

11.abnormal heartbeat

12.large weight gain in a short period of time

13.swelling of the arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs

Because the insulin is administered by the use of a needle, people can develop side effects to the injection site. As the medicine enters the tissues under the skin, it can cause local inflammation and irritation. Diabetics can develop pain, itching or redness at the site of the insulin injection.

Medication Errors: Accidental mix-ups between insulin products can occur. Diabetics must check insulin labels before injection.

 Strategies To Handle the Potential Side Effects of Insulin

1.Make insulin injections practically painless.

insujet
InsuJet needle-free injection system for insulin administration (Blue)

Many people assume insulin injections will hurt. Often this is just a fear of needles dating back to childhood. But sometimes the fear goes much deeper: Some are concerned that injecting insulin means their disease is getting worse. But that notion is outdated. The important thing is not to avoid needles but to do everything that’s in your power to control your diabetes and prevent damage to your nerves, eyes and other organs.

Since insulin can’t be swallowed—digestive enzymes break it down before it can reach the bloodstream—it must be injected, whether you’re afraid of needles or not.

But advances in insulin-delivery devices have made injections practically painless. The needles used today are extremely thin and coated with silicone, so they slide in more easily.

Also, insulin is injected into the fatty tissue of the abdomen, upper arm or hips, where there are few nerve endings.

2.Prevent low blood sugar

hypowallet

Hypoglycemia occurs when blood glucose drops below normal, about 60 mg/dL, which can be triggered by administering too much insulin (the most common cause), delaying or missing a meal or exercising on an empty stomach.

Most FDA-approved insulin formulations are carefully calibrated so as not to cause hypoglycaemia but when blood sugar does drop, there are many strategies for managing it.

Learning the early signs—such as sweating, heart palpitations, hunger and feeling weak or faint—allows you to stop hypoglycemia in its tracks. Treat early signs with four ounces of orange juice, or up to five glucose tablets—and call your doctor.

If you’ve been on insulin therapy for many years and stop experiencing the early warning signs, you may be in danger of serious hypoglycemia (which can cause loss of consciousness). Keeping glucose tablets and pre-filled glucagon syringes on hand—if your doctor agrees—will ensure you’re prepared to keep your blood sugar at a healthy level.

3.Avoid insulin-related weight gain.

diabetes-diet-plan
Diabetes Diet: The Ultimate Diabetic Diet Plan, How To Lose Weight, Prevent And Cure Type 2 Diabetes (Diabetes, Diabetes Diet, Diabetes Diet Plan,Diabetes … Diabetes,Type 2 Diabetes Diet Book Book 1)

Perhaps you’ve heard that insulin can cause you to pack on pounds? While it does have the potential to cause weight gain, it poses no more of a weight risk than oral blood-glucose-lowering medications.

If you eat the same amount of food as you did before you started taking insulin, you will likely gain weight. The best way to prevent it is to modify your diet and increase physical activity once you start insulin, in order to help you achieve a healthy weight.

Work closely with your doctor and a nutritionist to take the steps necessary to prevent weight gain.

Some doctors will add the injectable medication pramlintide, which makes insulin more effective by blocking glucose release by the liver and slowing the emptying of the stomach, which, in turn, produces a feeling of fullness.

4.Try These Easy-to-Use Insulin Products

management-of-diabetes
Management of Diabetes: (Diet, Exercises, Lifestyle Modification and Medications)

Ask your doctor about these breakthroughs in comfort and convenience. They can make insulin therapy easier and more effective than ever before.

Silicone-coated needles This new breed of smaller, thinner insulin needle coated with silicone can make injections virtually painless.

Pens Pre-filled disposable insulin pens have tiny needles and are easy to use and more discreet than a syringe.

Rapid-acting insulin By beginning to work just five minutes after it is injected, and lasting approximately two to four hours, rapid-acting insulin allows some diabetics more flexibility when timing meals.

Room-temperature insulin This insulin can be safely stored at room temperature and doesn’t require refrigeration, providing diabetics a greater degree of freedom and convenience.

 Insulin pumps Delivering rapid-acting insulin throughout the day.

5.Insulin Advice

Think -like-a-pancreas
Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes with Insulin–Completely Revised and Updated

A. Diabetics should be instructed on glucose monitoring, proper injection technique, and the management of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia.

B.Diabetics  need to check insulin labels before injection to avoid medication errors.

C. Diabetics  should check blood sugar prior to driving a car or operating machinery.

D.Diabetics  need to speak to their doctor or health care professional if pregnant or if they intend to become pregnant.

 

For more great Health and Nutrition Tips refer to the website positivehealthwellness.com.Migraine Causes, Symptoms and Natural Remedies

If you have any information,questions, or feedback you would like to include in this post.

Please email momo19@diabetessupportsite.com or leave your comments below.

Side Effects Of Diabetes Medication

side-effects-of-diabetes-medications
Medications and Diabetes Risk: Mechanisms and Approach to Risk Reduction (Oxford American Pocket Notes)

A side effect is an unwanted problem caused by a medicine. For example, some diabetes medicines can cause nausea or an upset stomach when you first start taking them. Before you start a new medicine, ask your doctor about possible side effects and how you can avoid them. If the side effects of your medicine bother you, tell your doctor.

When you’re prescribed a new diabetes drug, ask your doctor which side effects to look out for. No two people respond the same way to the same medication, so it’s impossible to know if you’ll experience a certain side effect before taking the drug.

Type 1 diabetes, once called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is usually first found in children, teenagers, or young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin because your body no longer makes it. You also might need to take other types of diabetes medicines that work with insulin.

Type 2 diabetes, once called adult-onset diabetes or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is the most common form of diabetes. It can start when the body doesn’t use insulin as it should, a condition called insulin resistance. If the body can’t keep up with the need for insulin, you may need diabetes medicines. Many choices are available. Your doctor might prescribe two or more medicines. It is recommended that most people start with metformin, a kind of diabetes pill.

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs for the first time during pregnancy. The hormones of pregnancy or a shortage of insulin can cause gestational diabetes. Most women with gestational diabetes control it with meal planning and physical activity. But some women need insulin to reach their target blood glucose levels.

Types of Diab​etes Medicines

Diabetes medicines come in several forms.

1.Insu​lin


2-8℃ Insulin Refrigerate Case Mini Medicine Cooler Reefer Portable Refrigerator for Insulin

If your body no longer makes enough insulin, you’ll need to take it. Insulin is used for all types of diabetes. Your doctor can help you decide which way of taking insulin is best for you.

Taking injections. You’ll give yourself shots using a needle and syringe. The syringe is a hollow tube with a plunger. You will put your dose of insulin into the tube. Some people use an insulin pen, which looks like a pen but has a needle for its point.

Using an insulin pump. An insulin pump is a small machine about the size of a cell phone, worn outside of your body on a belt or in a pocket or pouch. The pump connects to a small plastic tube and a very small needle. The needle is inserted under the skin and stays in for several days. Insulin is pumped from the machine through the tube into your body.

Using an insulin jet injector. The jet injector, which looks like a large pen, sends a fine spray of insulin through the skin with high-pressure air instead of a needle.

Using an insulin infuser. A small tube is inserted just beneath the skin and remains in place for several days. Insulin is injected into the end of the tube instead of through the skin.

What does insuli​n do?

Insulin helps keep blood glucose levels on target by moving glucose from the blood into your body’s cells. Your cells then use glucose for energy. In people who don’t have diabetes, the body makes the right amount of insulin on its own. But when you have diabetes, you and your doctor must decide how much insulin you need throughout the day and night.

Your plan for taking insulin will depend on your daily routine and your type of insulin. Some people with diabetes who use insulin need to take it two, three, or four times a day to reach their blood glucose targets. Others can take a single shot. Your doctor or diabetes educator will help you learn how and when to give yourself insulin.

Each type of insulin works at a different speed. For example, rapid-acting insulin starts to work right after you take it. Long-acting insulin works for many hours. Most people need two or more types of insulin to reach their blood glucose targets.

For information on the different types of insulin refer to the webpage Insulin Facts

Insulin Side Effects

insulin-therapy
Insulin Therapy: A Pocket Guide

Hypoglycemia is the most common and serious side effect of insulin, occurring in type 1 and type 2 diabetics.

Symptoms of low blood sugar(Hypoglycemia) can be mild, such as a feeling of lightheadedness, but can also be severe. In extreme cases, low blood sugar can even lead to coma and death. Other symptoms of low blood sugar include sweating, confusion and rapid breathing. Loss of consciousness is a less common, but severe symptom of low blood sugar.

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2.Diabet​es Pills

worst-pills-best-pills
Worst Pills, Best Pills: A Consumer’s Guide to Preventing Drug-Induced Deat

If some combination of losing weight, making dietary changes and exercising doesn’t help a Type 2 diabetic achieve target blood sugar levels, a doctor will prescribe oral antidiabetic medications.

Along with meal planning and physical activity, diabetes pills help people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes keep their blood glucose levels on target. Several kinds of pills are available. Each works in a different way. Many people take two or three kinds of pills. Some people take combination pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and insulin.

Your doctor may ask you to try one kind of pill. If it doesn’t help you reach your blood glucose targets, your doctor may ask you to

A.Take more of the same pill

B.Add another kind of pill

C.Change to another type of pill

D.Start taking insulin

E.Start taking another injected medicine

If your doctor suggests that you take insulin or another injected medicine, it doesn’t mean your diabetes is getting worse. Instead, it means you need insulin or another type of medicine to reach your blood glucose targets. Everyone is different. What works best for you depends on your usual daily routine, eating habits, and activities, and your other health conditions.

Many types of diabetes pills can help people with type 2 diabetes lower their blood glucose. Each class of pill helps lower blood glucose in a different way.

Diabetes drugs, alongside a healthy diet and exercise routine, help people with type 2 diabetes/gestational diabetes to maintain stable blood glucose levels.

The 5 Components That Make Every Meal Gut-Healing

A variety of different diabetes drugs are available, with each performing a different function. Many people with diabetes have to take more than one type of pill, with some taking pills which combine two types of drug in one tablet.

For information on the different types of Type 2 diabetes medication refer to http://diabetessupportsite/diabetes-pills-information

Some people experience a variety of side effects from different oral diabetes drugs.

Each of the medicines discussed here has side effects and other warnings and precautions. Some diabetes pills have been associated with increased risk of heart disease. It is important to discuss the risks and benefits of a drug with your doctor before starting any therapy.

A.Sulfonylureas

Analytical-method-development-and-validation
Analytical Method Development and Validation: Simultaneous Estimation of Pioglitazone and Glimepiride in Tablet Dosage Form by RP-HPLC

These pills do two things:

Help your pancreas make more insulin.

Help your body use the insulin it makes.

For these pills to work, your pancreas has to make some insulin.

Generic names for some of the more common sufonylureas are glimepiride, glyburide, chlorpropamide, and glipizide.

Some sulfonylureas work all day, so you take them only once a day – usually before breakfast. Others you take twice a day, typically before breakfast and before supper. Your doctor will tell you how many times a day you should take your diabetes pills.

Some possible side effects include low blood glucose (hypoglycemia), upset stomach, skin rash or itching, and/or weight gain.

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3.Injections Other Than ​Insulin

In addition to insulin, other types of injected medicines are now available.

New- Mechanisms- in- Glucose- Control
New Mechanisms in Glucose Control

Other drugs include:

(A)Albiglutide (Tanzeum)

GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1).
The Insulinotropic Gut Hormone Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (Frontiers in Diabetes)

It’s a man-made version of a hormone called GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1). Your intestines normally release this substance when you eat. It helps control your blood sugar.

Who can take it: Adults who have type 2 diabetes and haven’t had success with other treatment. If you’re planning to get pregnant, talk with your doctor, since researchers haven’t studied albiglutide in pregnant women.

What it does: After you eat, albiglutide helps your pancreas release insulin, which moves blood sugar (glucose) into your cells. It also limits how much of the hormone glucagon your body makes. This substance spurs your liver to release stored sugar. The drug also slows down digestion.

Side effects: The most common ones are upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhea, nausea, and skin reactions where you give yourself the shot. All GLP-1 drugs, including albiglutide, have a boxed warning noting that in animal studies, this type of drug has been linked to thyroid cancer in some rats and mice. Experts don’t know whether it has the same effect in people, though. Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe, is another side effect.

11 Facts About Your Thyroid

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daily-medication-logbook

 It is important for you to keep a written record of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this medication journal with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

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