Diabetes and Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder in which your breathing stops and restarts while you’re asleep. These pauses can last for anywhere between a few seconds to minutes, and can happen 30 times or more during one hour of sleep.

When your breathing stops, your body snaps out of a deep restful sleep. People with sleep apnea are often tired during the day because they aren’t getting good quality sleep.

There are two different types of sleep apnea.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common. This is when your airways collapse or become blocked while you’re sleeping.

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is less common. This is when your brain doesn’t send the right signals to the muscles that control your breathing.

For more great Health and Nutrition Tips refer to the website positivehealthwellness.com.

The Ultimate Guide To Curing Insomnia and Getting A Good Nights Sleep

Symptoms for both are similar and can include:

1.Loud snoring or snorting after pauses in breathing (associated with OSA)

2.Headaches in the morning

3.Being extremely tired during the day

4.Waking up in the middle of the night with shortness of breath (associated with CSA)

5.Having a sore throat or dry mouth in the morning when you wake up

6.Trouble staying focused

7.Difficulty staying asleep at night

Anyone can get sleep apnea, but you’re more likely to develop the condition if you:

1.Are overweight

2.Have a family history of sleep apnea

3.Have a thick neck or smaller airways

4.Are over 60

5.Have frequent nasal congestion or allergies

6.Smoke cigarettes, drink excessively, or use sedatives or tranquilizers

Many people don’t know they have sleep apnea until a family member or bed partner complains about them snoring. If you think you have the condition, it’s important to tell your doctor. He or she may recommend a sleep study to diagnose the condition.

Treatments include wearing a mouthpiece or using a breathing device called a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) while you sleep to keep airways open, and in more severe cases, surgery.

Sleep apnea is a serious condition that can increase your risk for other medical issues such as high blood pressure, heart problems, depression, and poor blood sugar control.

Sleep Apnea and Diabetes Connection

Obstructive sleep apnea is often associated with obesity and diabetes.

One study suggests that 40 percent of people who have OSA also have diabetes, and that up to 58 percent of people who have diabetes have some type of sleep disordered breathing.

While risk factors like obesity, family history, and getting older play a role in both conditions, researchers believe they’re not the only link.

OSA has many negative effects on the body. For example, it causes oxygen levels in the blood to drop. Frequent interruptions in deep sleep also affect metabolism and the body’s ability to properly control blood sugar levels.

OSA can also cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance on its own in people who don’t have diabetes.

It is reported that being treated with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine helped people who have both type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea have better blood sugar control.

If you have one condition, there is no guarantee you’ll get the other, though you are at increased risk. Getting sleep apnea diagnosed and treated can reduce your risk of developing diabetes and can help treat existing diabetes.

If you have any information,questions, or feedback you would like to include in this post.

Please email momo19@diabetessupportsite.com or leave your comments below

Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems

GOOD-NIGHT-SLEEP-KIT
The Good Night Sleep Kit: The Essential Tool For Restful Sleep

Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep.  It’s a vicious cycle.

As the amount of sleep decreases, blood sugar increases, escalating the issue. Lack of sleep has been shown to increase blood sugar levels and the risk of diabetic issues.

Higher blood sugar means less long-lasting fat metabolism in the night and even less sleep.

Researchers  found that people who slept less than 6 hours a night had more blood sugar complications compared to those who received 8 hours of sleep.

The dawn phenomenon occurs when the body releases growth and other hormones around 3 a.m. or 4 a.m. to prepare the body for awakening.  Making you wake up to a high blood sugar reading in the morning, even if your number was good when you went to bed the night before.

These hormones make the body less sensitive to insulin, the hormone that lowers blood sugar. In people with diabetes, these changes can lead to a morning blood sugar spike.

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HIGH BLOOD SUGAR – HYPERGLYCEMIA

Sleepless and restless nights hurt more than your mood and energy; it is a form of chronic stress on the body.  When there is added stress on your body this results in having higher blood sugar levels. When researchers restricted people with type1 diabetes to just 4 hours of sleep, their sensitivity to insulin was reduced by 20% compared to that after a full night of sleep.

When your blood sugar is really high, your kidneys will try to get rid of it by removing it from the body via urination.  This most likely causes you to get out of bed and go to the bathroom all night, resulting in inconsistent sleep patterns.  It can also wake you up by feelings of thirstiness.

High blood sugar levels also make it less comfortable for you to sleep by feelings of warmness, irritability and unsettledness.

For more great Health and Nutrition Tips refer to the website positivehealthwellness.com.15 Easy Ways to Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

LOW BLOOD SUGAR – HYPOGLYCEMIA

On the opposite end of the spectrum, if your blood glucose is too low, hypoglycemia, you may also wake up during the night.  Every cell in your body needs sugar to work properly. It’s your body’s main source of energy.  When your sugar levels fall too low it can cause a variety of problems within your central nervous system which can include:

1.Hunger

2.Weakness

3.Dizziness

4.Nervousness

5.Anxiousness

6.Irritability

7.Chills

8.Sweating

9.Tingling or numbness of mouth

10.Blurred Vision

11.Headache

12.Confusion

13.Nightmares

14.Sleepwalking

15.Restlessness

The next time you wake up during the night with these symptoms, check your blood glucose. When there is a drop in the blood glucose level, it causes the release of hormones that regulate glucose levels, such as adrenaline, glucagon, cortisol, and growth hormone. These compounds stimulate the brain. They are a natural signal that it is time to eat.

Good bedtime snacks to keep blood sugar levels steady throughout the night are oatmeal and other whole grain cereals, whole grain breads and muffins, and other complex carbohydrates. These foods will not only help maintain blood sugar levels, they actually can help promote sleep by increasing the level of serotonin in the brain.

Severe low blood sugar is sometimes called insulin shock. Untreated, it can be very dangerous, resulting in seizures, loss of consciousness, or death.

What can you do to keep your blood sugar balanced?

teach-your-child-to-sleep

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The best way to avoid this whole pattern is to:

1.Choose protein every time you eat, along with high-fiber carbs and healthy fats.

2.Minimize sugars

3.Eat “half-size” meals so your blood sugar doesn’t go so high.

4.Eat every three to four hours (depending on your body’s needs) so your blood sugar doesn’t dip too low.

5.Avoid eating sugar or processed high-carb foods especially within two hours of bedtime.

This is important even if you are not diabetic and your blood tests show a normal blood sugar. It is best to start implementing these tips now rather than later, because if this pattern continues unaddressed, it can lead to further issues down the line.

When insulin is responding in high amounts day after day, and year after year because of high carbohydrate meals and imbalanced blood sugar levels, your cells stop responding to the insulin so efficiently (known as insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome) and/or your insulin level can drop permanently (also known as diabetes).

This means your blood sugar levels stay high and this too, can cause you to feel sleepy after eating carbs because you do not have enough insulin to transport the sugar from your blood into your cells where it can be turned into energy.

When it gets to that point it is even more important to follow these tips in order to keep your blood sugar balanced and your sleep patterns healthy.

Your body responds to increasing or decreasing blood sugar levels with hormones that attempt to keep the level steady, but if those hormones can’t keep up with your eating patterns, then they are no longer able to manage the fluctuating blood sugar levels.

So, it is clear that your decisions about what to eat and when have a huge part to play in regulating your blood sugar levels; if you feed your body in a way that keeps your blood sugar levels balanced, you will prevent diabetes and ensure a good night’s sleep.

 

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Please email momo19@diabetessupportsite.com or leave your comments below

How Diabetes Affects Sleep

healthy-habits-for-life

Healthy Habits For Life: 13 Morning Habits, That Help You Lose Weight, Live Healthy & Find Energy (Mini Habits, Increase Metabolism, Prevent Diabetes, Sleep Sound) (Healthy Habits Books)

Sleep difficulties are more common in people who have diabetes than in people who don’t.

Research has shown that sleep deprivation and insulin resistance may be linked.

The reason this is true is that people who dont get enough sleep are more prone to eating higher carbohydrate meals!

Also I noticed myself that when I am out for a night out especially after drinking some alcohol I eat a lot more processed unhealthy food the following day!

This is because sleep deprivation and alcohol cause unstable blood sugar levels!

People who regularly lack sleep will feel more tired through the day and more likely to eat comfort foods.

A good night’s sleep is important for our hormones to regulate a large number of the body’s processes, such as appetite, weight control and the immune system. Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep, which results in trouble sleeping.

Difficulty getting a good night’s rest could be a result of a number of reasons, from hypos at night, to high blood sugars, sleep apnea, being overweight or signs of neuropathy.

If you have blood sugar levels that are either too high or too low overnight, you may find yourself tired through the next day.

Lethargy and insomnia can both have their roots in poor blood sugar control.

1.Sleep Deprivation and Insulin Resistance

Controlling blood sugar levels is one of the most powerful ways to reduce your risk of chronic diseases, including high blood pressure, heart disease, and cancer. The increase in Type 2 diabetes we’re now seeing is largely due lot of people eating high carbohydrate meals and lack of exercise.

People who dont get an adequate amount of sleep are more prone to getting Type 2 diabetes because sleep deprivation causes people to want to eat more high carbohydrate meals!

Eating too much carbohydrate foods causes insulin resistance which leads to Type 2 diabetes!

Insulin resistance is when a person has not enough insulin to break down all the carbohydrate into energy needed for the body.

Also eating too many carbohydrates causes your blood sugar levels to rise too high which can lead to ketones in the blood.

This can lead to ketoacidosis which is a very serious medical condition associated with insulin dependent diabetes!

To read more about this click here!

2.Sleep Has Serious Consequences To Your Metabolism

A-good-nights-sleep

The Harvard Medical School Guide to a Good Night’s Sleep (Harvard Medical School Guides)

Sleep deprivation tends to lead to food cravings, particularly for sweet and starchy foods.

If you’re chronically sleep deprived, consistently giving in to these sugar cravings will virtually guarantee that you’ll gain weight.

This  is a surefire way to gain weight, as a lack of insulin will seriously impair your body’s ability to burn and digest fat.

It also increases your risk of Type 2 diabetes. In short, sleep deprivation can lead to insulin resistance, which can lead to increased weight and decreased health.

3.Blood Sugar and Sleep Problems

Sleep can affect your blood sugar levels, and your blood glucose control can also affect your sleep.  It’s a vicious cycle.

People who have diabetes often get low blood sugar levels at night and this causes sleep deprivation!

Low blood sugar levels can lead to hypoglycemia!For more information about hypoglycemia click here!

Also diabetics can experience high blood sugar levels at night which results in frequent urinating,feeling thirsty and also can lead to a coma which is a very deep sleep and even death!

High blood sugar levels can lead to hyperglycemia!For more information about hyperglycemia click here!

Click Here For More Information

The Ultimate Guide To Curing Insomnia and Getting A Good Nights Sleep

 4.Diabetes and Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder in which your breathing stops and restarts while you’re asleep. These pauses can last for anywhere between a few seconds to minutes, and can happen 30 times or more during one hour of sleep.

When your breathing stops, your body snaps out of a deep restful sleep. People with sleep apnea are often tired during the day because they aren’t getting good quality sleep.

There are two different types of sleep apnea.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common. This is when your airways collapse or become blocked while you’re sleeping.

Central sleep apnea (CSA) is less common. This is when your brain doesn’t send the right signals to the muscles that control your breathing.

Click Here For More Information

 

5.Diabetic Neuropathy And Sleep Problems

When dealing with neuropathy, you might think insomnia is the least of your problems. The effects of neuropathy symptoms and sleep disturbances are difficult.

Neuropathy can affect sleep in several ways.

For some people, neuropathy symptoms, such as abnormal sensations or hypersensitivity to touch, particularly in the feet and legs, may make it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep.

Without daytime distractions such as work, friends or hobbies, many diabetics find themselves focusing more on the pain in the evening, reporting that their perception of pain actually increases when trying to sleep.

For others, sleep disturbances can aggravate neuropathy symptoms. For example, sleep deprivation can lower your pain threshold and make the neuropathic pain feel worse.

People who sleep poorly are susceptible to depression and other mood disorders, changes in eating, decrease in physical activity and an overall decline in health. Compounded with neuropathy, this becomes a vicious cycle.

If sleep problems interfere with your ability to function, it may be time to consult your doctor.

Describe your sleep symptoms to your doctor, the effects of sleep symptoms on your daily activities and neuropathy, and medication history. That’s because many prescription medications and some herbal remedies can affect the quality of your sleep.

After evaluating your neuropathy symptoms and sleep problems – as well as ruling out other causes of sleep disturbances – your doctor will review with you:

Self-help techniques – These are techniques you can adopt (see section below on tips for a better night sleep)

Non-pharmacological treatments – These include cognitive behavioral therapy, relaxation techniques and stress management .

They are preferred to prescription sleep medications, which can lead to sleepiness during the day, cause dependency and have side effects.

Pharmacological treatments – Used as a last resort, these should only be used temporarily, especially when the insomnia is chronic. Sometimes, medicines used to reduce pain or aid sleep can affect your sleep.

Over-the-counter pain medications – For mild pain, over-the-counter pain medications , such as Tylenol and Advil, may suffice. Some over-the-counter pain medications, such as Advil PM or Tylenol PM, also have an antihistamine to help with sleep.

Prescription medications—For more severe or chronic pain, your doctor may recommend prescription pain medications such as codeine, and morphine. Some antidepressants and anticonvulsants can also be prescribed.

To help with sleep, your doctor might recommend drugs typically prescribed for anxiety, called benzodiazepines (e.g., lorazepam, clonazepam, triazolam), and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics that are particularly helpful for sleep and appear to be better for longer-term use than benzodiazepines (e.g., zolpidem, eszopiclone, zaleplon).

Poor sleep, depressed mood and anxiety can complicate you(and your doctor’s) efforts to manage neuropathic pain. The key is to recognize this and work with your doctor to find the right treatments and approaches that work best for you.

6.Link Between Insomnia and Diabetes

Sleep gives the body time to relax and repair and is now also understood to play a role in learning. Insomnia, however, is one of the most common complaints , and it also has a link to Type 2 diabetes. Sleep deprivation can make diabetes worse, and diabetes symptoms can make it harder to sleep.

Insomnia isn’t just an occasional rough night or sleeping less than you think you should.

The key question to determine if you have insomnia is “how rested do I feel?”

If you have all the energy and alertness you want, you don’t have insomnia, no matter how little sleep you get. On the other hand, if you’re tired and drowsy all day, you may have insomnia, even if you’re in bed 12 hours a night.

The quality of sleep is as important as the quantity. For example, if you’re struggling for breath all night or your body can’t relax because of stress and tension, you may not feel rested no matter how much you sleep.

There are at least three kinds of insomnia: problems getting to sleep, problems staying asleep, and waking up too early and not being able to go back to sleep.

Problems getting to sleep (sleep-onset insomnia) are often due to stress, too much activity or anxiety at bedtime, or bad sleep habits.

Problems staying asleep (sleep-maintenance insomnia) are often due to medical problems  such as sleep apnea or an enlarged prostate. We all wake up 12–15 times a night, but we usually get right back to sleep without ever realizing or remembering we’ve been awake. It’s insomnia if you can’t get back to sleep easily.

Problems with waking up too early are often a sign of depression, or they may be caused by noise and light in the bedroom.

While sleeplessness can promote Type 2 diabetes, symptoms associated with high blood glucose, low blood glucose (hypoglycemia), and some diabetes complications can also interfere with sleep.

If your blood glucose level is high, you may be in the bathroom urinating every few hours during the night.

Hypoglycemia can cause hunger that wakes you up to get food, a rapid heartbeat, dizziness or shaking.

Fatigue from a poor night’s sleep may keep some people with diabetes from getting enough daytime activity, which in turn makes it harder to sleep the following night.

Both insomnia and “hypersomnia” (sleeping too much) are classic symptoms of depression.

If you lie in bed having thoughts of hopelessness or worthlessness, especially in the early morning, you may be depressed. Because depression is a risk factor for other problems and because it is treatable, you should seek professional help.

TIPS FOR A BETTER NIGHT SLEEP

Getting into a consistent sleep routine will improve your overall health and you will see improvements in blood sugar as well.

People are more prone to sitting in the couch and watching television and that’s alright for awhile but if you spend too long doing this you can end up putting on a lot of weight!

Also spending too long sitting on the couch can make you feel tired!

Also sitting around watching too much television takes up a lot of time that could be spent on more active hobbies like running,cycling,swimming,horse riding,gardening and fishing!

The most important thing to remember is that people are very inactive nowadays!

The television can also be very negative sometimes giving young people the wrong idea!

The most important point to remember is the evening time is a time for relaxing and unwinding!

I love lying on the couch reading a book,gazing into the fire dreaming about this site hoping it will help people!

I think that this life is so short we might as well make the most of it!

I got a new three piece sofa the other day I love it!

It is brown suede which was bought in Affordable Luxury in County Waterford!

Also I got six cream cushions in Home Depot on sale for a hundred euros!

My new suede three piece couch

I was wondering what type of couches people had in their homes!

Why dont we start a discussion to see what type of couch is the most popular?

The following sleep tips may help to promote better sleep:

1.Check and monitor your blood glucose to keep it under control. The more balanced your blood sugar is during the day, the better you will sleep at night. The better you sleep, the less likely it is that you will gain weight, or develop type 2 diabetes, or any of the other health issues associated with a lack of sleep.

2.Establish a regular bedtime routine

3.Ensure your bed is large and comfortable enough

4,Ensure your room is cool and well ventilated

5.Ensure your room is dark and free from noise


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6.Incorporating a period of exercise into each day.Keep in mind that stress,emotional and/or physical can can blood sugar issues . Use herbs to decrease your stress levels as well as exercise !

7.Keep a regular sleep/wake schedule.

8.Develop a bedtime ritual, such as taking a warm bath or reading light material.

9.Limit or eliminate caffeine four to six hours before bed and minimize daytime use.

10.Avoid smoking, especially near bedtime or if you awake in the middle of the night.

11.Avoid alcohol and heavy meals before you go to bed.

12.Turn off your TV, smartphone, iPad and computer a few hours before your bedtime.

13.You also can adopt relaxation techniques to help induce sleep. These include giving yourself an extra hour before bed to relax and unwind, and time to plan for the following day,meditating,doing deep breathing exercises.

14.Listen to restful music or nature sounds or a relaxation tape.

15.Put on socks so that cold feet don’t keep you awake.

16.Lose weight, overweight makes it harder to sleep and can cause sleep apnea. Another reason to get in shape.

17.Temperature can also be a factor. An overactive radiator could have you waking up in a sweat, so be sure to set your thermostat appropriately.

18.Napping may leave you less tired at bedtime, setting the stage for insomnia.Long naps should be avoided if you have insomnia.

19.Since so many things can hinder or promote sleep, many people find it helpful to keep a sleep diary to figure out what’s keeping them up or what works best to help them sleep.

If you have any information,questions, or feedback you would like to include in this post.

Please email momo19@diabetessupportsite.com or leave your comments below